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  Article ID: 19

  Asthma Treatment Plan

  Mary-Jay Health and Education

  Your treatment plan may also include:

   Avoid your asthma triggers such as allergen food, environment, animals, etc. Things that could make you uncomfortable upon contact. Your doctor, allergist could give you the list.

   Motivate yourself by have a personal goal. For example, goals might include being symptom-free at night or being able to play sports.

   Ask your Asthma education for An asthma diary or buy one in close by drug store. In the diary, you write down your peak flow, what symptoms you are having and what caused them, and any medicines you used.

   Ask your doctor for asthma action plan.

   Master your asthma action plan. This is what you will do when your asthma is worse and you need to prevent an attack.

   The action plan could include how to use a peak flow meter to check your peak flow. Peak flow is a measure of how open your airways are. A drop in peak flow can show that the airways have narrowed even before you have symptoms. Then you can start treatment right away to help prevent an attack.

   How to use a metered-dose inhaler or dry powder inhaler. Using a metered-dose inhaler with a spacer is an easy way to get the medicine to your lungs. But you have to use the inhaler correctly for it to work well. If you are not sure that you are using your inhaler the right way, ask your doctor to show you how. Your doctor can also tell you if you need to use a spacer with your type of inhaler.

   What symptoms to watch for. Symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, or tiring quickly during exercise can mean that your asthma is not well-controlled. Having these symptoms may mean that you need to see your doctor and adjust your treatment.

  Reference

  Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA)

 

 

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