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  Article ID: 11

  Topical treatment of allergy

  Men's Health

  Dr. Lyndon E. Mansfield

  Lyndon E. Mansfield, M.D., CPI, is the director of Western Sky Medical Research in El Paso, Texas, and a clinical professor of pediatrics at Texas Tech Regional Health Science Center. He's also on the board of directors of the Texas Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Society.

  Doctor's Advice

  When it comes to treating his own allergies, Dr. Mansfield practices what he preaches. "I like to treat symptoms topically, both in myself and in others, because I learned in medical school that it's usually safer and more efficient to deliver medicine right to the area you're trying to treat," he says. For him, that means using a nasal antihistamine spray like Astepro, and steroids such as Nasonex and Veramist to treat his mild nasal allergies.

  Other examples of topical treatments include eye drops or artificial tears for irritated eyes, and inhalers for asthma, instead of popping pills. The therapeutic index—ratio of possible benefits to possible harm—is greater with topical treatments, Dr. Mansfield says.

  Note: To some of us that are not medically inclined. Topical skin treatment is a treatment that is applied on the skin, and not administered orally or by any other route into the body

 

 

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